Worst Foods For Oral Health

Worst Foods For Oral Health

Posted by Pei Peng on Sep 23 2022, 04:59 AM

Worst Foods For Oral Health

The food we eat affects more than just our waistlines. Everything that we put in our mouth can affect our teeth, gums, and mouth. Even though we may enjoy burgers and fries, these foods can be harmful to our smiles. Sticky and sugary foods cling to the enamel on our teeth. If plaque is not brushed away, the sugars can turn into acid. This acid can eat away at the enamel and cause cavities. Here is a list of foods and beverages that can damage our oral health: 

  • Sugary Foods

Sugary foods are some of the worst for oral health. That’s because all foods that contain sugar have bacteria in them, and those bacteria can contribute to tooth decay. Plus, sugary foods tend to cling to your teeth, so they’re more difficult to wash away.

  • Coffee and Tea

Coffee and tea are two of the most common beverages in the world. However, they are also two of the most acidic beverages. Drinking them regularly could be bad news for your oral health.

Coffee and tea are acidic and can erode the enamel of your teeth. Over time, this could lead to tooth decay and even gum disease. If you drink a lot of coffee or tea, it’s important to rinse your mouth with water after drinking it.

  • Starchy Foods

Starchy foods, such as potato chips, pretzels, and cookies, are often high in carbohydrates. Carbohydrates break down into sugars and can cause tooth decay if left on the teeth for too long.

  • Acidic Foods

Acidic foods can be harmful to the teeth because they erode the enamel. Although certain foods can erode the enamel, there are others that can help remineralize it as well. It’s best to consume more low-acidic foods and limit your consumption of high-alkaline foods.

  • Sticky Foods

Sticky foods, like dried fruit, chewy candies, and gummy bears, can stick to your teeth. When foods like these are stuck to your teeth, they can attract bacteria, cause decay, and lead to cavities. Foods that are high in sugar can feed the bacteria in your mouth, which increases your risk of cavities. If you do snack on sticky foods, be sure to brush and floss your teeth soon after to avoid plaque buildup.

  • Sports Drinks

Sports drinks are a popular beverage choice among athletes, but they shouldn’t be used as a substitute for water. They can actually have a harmful effect on your oral health. While sports drinks contain important electrolytes like potassium and sodium, they also contain sugar and acid that wear down your enamel. The acid and sugar can contribute to cavities.

  • Alcoholic Beverages

Most alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, and hard liquors) are considered acidic because they contain high levels of sugar. Acidic foods and drinks wear away enamel, leaving teeth more vulnerable to decay. In addition to their acidity, alcoholic beverages also contain harmful toxins and chemicals. The effects of alcohol are also more damaging to oral health over time. Alcohol causes dehydration, which leads to dry mouth, and dry mouth is a risk factor for decay.

  • Tobacco Products

Tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco, and snuff, are some of the worst foods for oral health. They are extremely harmful to teeth and gums, and they can also lead to oral cancer. Smoking can also cause dental implants to fail. That’s because smoking tends to cause tooth loss and damage its surrounding bone structure. 

To learn more about our dental services, schedule an appointment with iSmile Dental Group Ohio. We are located at 1151 Bethel Road Suite #301, Columbus, OH 43220. Contact us at (614) 459-3229 or visit our website for more information. 

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